Resume Example

Firstname I. Lastname, PMP
Cell Number    •    Email Address

Project Manager / Business Analyst [the best description of your skill set]
Over 20 years of Project Management experience in State, Federal and Local Prisons.
Occasionally capable of completing grammatically and syntactically correct sentences.
Outstanding strengths in leadership, team building and not completely screwing up.
Able to leap small door stops in a single bound.
B.S. degree in IT Management.
PMP and MCSE certified.


COMPETENCIES

List professional skills hereList technical skills and tools hereProject Management
Project Management Office (PMO)
Relocation Management
Additional Competency
List technical environments, etc.Highlight and summarize skillsAnother Competency
Still Another Competency
Yet Another Competency
And the Competencies just pile up

 

EXPERIENCE

Project Manager
California Department of Something or Other (CDSO)
11/06 – Present

  • Retained to do something very clever
  • Brief statement of accomplishments or achievements
  • Use specific, descriptive job titles — not generic terms like “consultant”
  • List your job title or function first.  It’s most important
    • Then the company or organization or project
    • Then your dates of employment
    • This makes all data easy to find and read, and provides some spacing between entries
  • Describe what you did – not merely your “responsibilities”
  • Use short, bulleted lines, not long paragraphs
  • Try to make each bullet point only one line long
  • If a bullet entry will be longer than two lines, break it into two bulleted lines
  • Be as specific as possible
  • Use metrics:
    • Project budget
    • Money you saved via some incredible contribution or insight
    • Number of people managed
    • Number of facilities, teams, units, etc.
  • Avoid putting your name or contact information in headers or footers
    • Although scanning technology has improved, sometimes when your resume is scanned into a database data in the header and footer is lost
    • The last thing you want is to have someone love your resume – and not know who it belongs to, or how to reach you
  • Use action verbs, not the passive tense
  • Use minimal formatting
  • Use one font, with perhaps a different font for your name, etc. at the top
  • Avoid special spacing and characters
  • Try to make sure that your resume will remain readable when scanned into a database:
    • Hyphens are always reliable, as are any ASCII symbols or text
    • Bullets may be retained when scanned into a new digital form
    • Special characters like arrows, etc. will usually be lost – and replace with questions marks or random, distracting symbols
  • Do not try to format or space your resume to fit neatly on the page you see on your screen.
    • Computers and monitors show the “same” data slightly differently
    • No matter how carefully you try to make your resume fit just right – your efforts are doomed.
    • Just space each section consistently, and you’ll actually end up with a resume that’s much more user friendly than one with unexpected spaces
  • Continue like this for each employer

Business Analyst
Private Co.
11/06

  • Retained to do something very clever
  • Brief statement of accomplishments or achievements
  • Use specific, descriptive job titles — not generic terms like “consultant”
  • List your job title or function first.  It’s most important
    • Then the company or organization or project
    • Then your dates of employment
    • This makes all data easy to find and read, and provides some spacing between entries
  • Describe what you did – not merely your “responsibilities”
  • Use short, bulleted lines, not long paragraphs
  • Try to make each bullet point only one line long
  • If a bullet entry will be longer than two lines, break it into two bulleted lines
  • Be as specific as possible
  • Use metrics:
    • Project budget
    • Money you saved via some incredible contribution or insight
    • Number of people managed
    • Number of facilities, teams, units, etc.
  • Avoid putting your name or contact information in headers or footers
    • Although scanning technology has improved, sometimes when your resume is scanned into a database data in the header and footer is lost
    • The last thing you want is to have someone love your resume – and not know who it belongs to, or how to reach you
  • Use action verbs, not the passive tense
  • Use minimal formatting
  • Use one font, with perhaps a different font for your name, etc. at the top
  • Avoid special spacing and characters
  • Try to make sure that your resume will remain readable when scanned into a database:
    • Hyphens are always reliable, as are any ASCII symbols or text
    • Bullets may be retained when scanned into a new digital form
    • Special characters like arrows, etc. will usually be lost – and replace with questions marks or random, distracting symbols
  • Do not try to format or space your resume to fit neatly on the page you see on your screen.
    • Computers and monitors show the “same” data slightly differently
    • No matter how carefully you try to make your resume fit just right – your efforts are doomed.
    • Just space each section consistently, and you’ll actually end up with a resume that’s much more user friendly than one with unexpected spaces
  • Continue like this for each employer

 Project Manager
Some University  (SU)
10/05 – 7/06

  • Retained to do something very clever
  • Brief statement of accomplishments or achievements
  • Use specific, descriptive job titles — not generic terms like “consultant”
  • List your job title or function first.  It’s most important
    • Then the company or organization or project
    • Then your dates of employment
    • This makes all data easy to find and read, and provides some spacing between entries
  • Describe what you did – not merely your “responsibilities”
  • Use short, bulleted lines, not long paragraphs
  • Try to make each bullet point only one line long
  • If a bullet entry will be longer than two lines, break it into two bulleted lines
  • Be as specific as possible
  • Use metrics:
    • Project budget
    • Money you saved via some incredible contribution or insight
    • Number of people managed
    • Number of facilities, teams, units, etc.
  • Avoid putting your name or contact information in headers or footers
    • Although scanning technology has improved, sometimes when your resume is scanned into a database data in the header and footer is lost
    • The last thing you want is to have someone love your resume – and not know who it belongs to, or how to reach you
  • Use action verbs, not the passive tense
  • Use minimal formatting
  • Use one font, with perhaps a different font for your name, etc. at the top
  • Avoid special spacing and characters
  • Try to make sure that your resume will remain readable when scanned into a database:
    • Hyphens are always reliable, as are any ASCII symbols or text
    • Bullets may be retained when scanned into a new digital form
    • Special characters like arrows, etc. will usually be lost – and replace with questions marks or random, distracting symbols
  • Do not try to format or space your resume to fit neatly on the page you see on your screen.
    • Computers and monitors show the “same” data slightly differently
    • No matter how carefully you try to make your resume fit just right – your efforts are doomed.
    • Just space each section consistently, and you’ll actually end up with a resume that’s much more user friendly than one with unexpected spaces
  • Continue like this for each employer

Project Manager
California Department of Something Else (CDSE)
7/00 – 7/05

  • Retained to do something very clever
  • Brief statement of accomplishments or achievements
  • Use specific, descriptive job titles — not generic terms like “consultant”
  • List your job title or function first.  It’s most important
    • Then the company or organization or project
    • Then your dates of employment
    • This makes all data easy to find and read, and provides some spacing between entries
  • Describe what you did – not merely your “responsibilities”
  • Use short, bulleted lines, not long paragraphs
  • Try to make each bullet point only one line long
  • If a bullet entry will be longer than two lines, break it into two bulleted lines
  • Be as specific as possible
  • Use metrics:
    • Project budget
    • Money you saved via some incredible contribution or insight
    • Number of people managed
    • Number of facilities, teams, units, etc.
  • Avoid putting your name or contact information in headers or footers
    • Although scanning technology has improved, sometimes when your resume is scanned into a database data in the header and footer is lost
    • The last thing you want is to have someone love your resume – and not know who it belongs to, or how to reach you
  • Use action verbs, not the passive tense
  • Use minimal formatting
  • Use one font, with perhaps a different font for your name, etc. at the top
  • Avoid special spacing and characters
  • Try to make sure that your resume will remain readable when scanned into a database:
    • Hyphens are always reliable, as are any ASCII symbols or text
    • Bullets may be retained when scanned into a new digital form
    • Special characters like arrows, etc. will usually be lost – and replace with questions marks or random, distracting symbols
  • Do not try to format or space your resume to fit neatly on the page you see on your screen.
    • Computers and monitors show the “same” data slightly differently
    • No matter how carefully you try to make your resume fit just right – your efforts are doomed.
    • Just space each section consistently, and you’ll actually end up with a resume that’s much more user friendly than one with unexpected spaces
  • Continue like this for each employer

Project Manager
California Department of Something Else (CDSE)
1/95 – 7/00

  • As you describe jobs or projects older than around 15 years, provide less data
  • Use fewer bullets and make your descriptions less detailed
  • Try to reference one or two significant accomplishments
  • Try to employ some metrics
  • And provide as much detail as you need, even in older jobs, if:
    • The older position or project is particularly relevant to your current work
    • You used skills or tools in the older job that are relevant to a new job
    • The older job included training, certifications or education that will be relevant to work you’re seeking now

     

EDUCATION AND CREDENTIALS

 BS,  IT Management:  ICU University, 1992

PMP Certified:  Project Management Institute, 2001

MCSE Certified, 2004

President, Some Professional Group or Other, 2000 – 2007

Any other brief notable accomplishments